George Marshall Medical Museum

George Marshall

Mr. George Hay Marshall was born in Edinburgh in January 1906. He qualified in Medicine from The University of Edinburgh in 1928, becoming a House Surgeon in Swindon and West Bromwich. He became a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1931, following a move from his home town to Worcester to become a junior partner in the general practice of Pollard and Rook. In 1935 he joined the Consultant staff of Worcester Royal Infirmary, taking up an unpaid position whilst continuing his general practice work. He became Consultant Surgeon to Worcester Royal Infirmary in 1948, giving up general practice completely in 1950. During his time at the WRI, he provided state of the art general surgical service to his patients, and joked that he knew the people of Worcester “inside and out!”.

 (c) Berrows Worcester Former display Toothpaste lids

After 36 years’ service, he retired in 1971. He was described by his professional colleagues as honourable, responsible and trustworthy and was recognised as an expert in his field. He was an enthusiastic collector of old medical and surgical equipment and by his retirement had accumulated a large and varied collection of several thousand objects (the bulk of our entire collection today). He generously presented his collection to the Postgraduate Education Centre at Ronkswood in Worcester in the 1970s and the collection was moved in 2002 when the new Education Centre was built at the Worcester Royal Hospital site on Newtown Road.

 

George Marshall Medical Museum

George Marshall Medical Museum is an Accredited museum with the Arts Council, demonstrating CHEC’s commitment to managing our collections effectively for the enjoyment and benefit of all of our users – these include NHS employees and other members of the public.

The museum is home to a fascinating collection of artefacts illustrating how medicine and health care have developed over the past 250 years. There is plenty to see, including a gory collection of death masks of hanged criminals, a reconstructed apothecary’s shop and 19th-century operating theatre. 

Admission to the Museum is free for walk-in visitors from both the Trust and the general public. We are open Monday to Friday 9am until 5pm except for Bank Holidays (last entries 4pm). If you’re interested in a talk or a guided tour, with the added opportunity to handle authentic medical artefacts used hundreds of years ago, then please contact the Curator, Louise Price, on 01905 760738 (or e-mail louise.price10@nhs.net).

Apothecary Shop Death Masks Museum

Researching Medical History?

Whether you are a member of staff looking for some interesting history about your own particular medical discipline, a student researching for a dissertation or PhD, or someone interested in their own family tree, we aim to provide easy access to our fascinating archive material, photographs, artefacts and books, and can provide quiet research space in the Rowlands Library.

Please get in touch if you have a particular research question in mind.